Jul
30
2010
0

Cup with ‘maze’ saucer

Oluk is a coffee cup, of which saucer is designed in the form of a maze to enable user navigate and play when coffee drips on it. Aim of the project is to reuse these drops and make the office hours and breakfasts more enjoyable. Project was exhibited in 2010 imm Cologne Fair, Germany.

Link to Oluk.

Written by Peter C in: Design,Food | Tags:
Jul
29
2010
0

Documentary: “The Rooftops of Hebron”

In 2000, the army closed Shohada Street, in Hebron, to Palestinians and sealed the entrances to the houses on the street. To leave her home, Malka Kafisha had to climb up through the roofs of neighboring houses.

Written by Peter C in: Events,Film,History | Tags: , ,
Jul
28
2010
1
Jul
27
2010
1
Jul
27
2010
0
Jul
27
2010
0

Lost collection of Ansel Adams photos found at garage sale worth $200 million.

From CNN:

Los Angeles, California (CNN) — Rick Norsigian’s hobby of picking through piles of unwanted items at garage sales in search of antiques has paid off for the Fresno, California, painter.

Two small boxes he bought 10 years ago for $45 — negotiated down from $70 — are now estimated to be worth at least $200 million, according to a Beverly Hills art appraiser.

Those boxes contained 65 glass negatives created by famed nature photographer Ansel Adams in the early period of his career. Experts believed the negatives were destroyed in a 1937 darkroom fire that destroyed 5,000 plates.

“It truly is a missing link of Ansel Adams and history and his career,” said David W. Streets, the appraiser and art dealer who is hosting an unveiling of the photographs at his Beverly Hills, California, gallery Tuesday.

The photographs apparently were taken between 1919 and the early 1930s, well before Adams — who is known as the father of American photography — became nationally recognized in the 1940s, Streets said.

“This is going to show the world the evolution of his eye, of his talent, of his skill, his gift, but also his legacy,” Streets said. “And it’s a portion that we thought had been destroyed in the studio fire.”

How these 6.5 x 8.5 inch glass plate negatives of famous Yosemite landscapes and San Francisco landmarks — some of them with fire damage — made their way from Adams collection 70 years ago to a Southern California garage sale in 2000 can only be guessed.

The person who sold them to Norsigian at the garage sale told him he bought them in the 1940s at a warehouse salvage in Los Angeles.

Photography expert Patrick Alt, who helped confirm the authenticity of the negatives, suspects Adams carried them to use in a photography class he was teaching in Pasadena, California, in the early 1940s.

“It is my belief that he brought these negatives with him for teaching purposes and to show students how to not let their negatives be engulfed in a fire,” Alt said. “I think this clearly explains the range of work in these negatives, from very early pictorialist boat pictures, to images not as successful, to images of the highest level of his work during this time period.”

Alt said it is impossible to know why Adams would store them in Pasadena and never reclaim them.

The plates were individually wrapped in newspaper inside deteriorating manila envelopes. Notations on each envelope appeared to have been made by Virginia Adams, the photographer’s wife, according to handwriting experts Michael Nattenberg and Marcel Matley. They compared them to samples provided by the Adams’ grandson.

While most of the negatives appear never to have been printed, several are nearly identical to well-known Adams prints, the experts said.

Meteorologist George Wright studied clouds and snow cover in a Norsigian negative to conclude that it was taken at about the same time as a known Adams photo of a Yosemite tree.

In addition to Yosemite — the California wilderness that Adams helped conserve — the negatives depict California’s Carmel Mission, views of a rocky point in Carmel, San Francisco’s Fisherman’s Wharf, a sailing yacht at sea and an image of sand dunes.

“The fact that these locations were well-known to Adams, and visited by him, further supports the proposition that all of the images in the collection were most probably created by Adams,” said art expert Robert Moeller.

Moeller said that after six months of study, he concluded “with a high degree of probability, that the images under consideration were produced by Ansel Adams.

Silver tarnishing on the negatives also helped date the plates to around the 1920s, Alt said.

“I have sent people to prison for the rest of their lives for far less evidence than I have seen in this case,” said evidence and burden of proof expert Manny Medrano, who was hired by Norsigian to help authenticate them. “In my view, those photographs were done by Ansel Adams.”

Norsigian, who has spent the last decade trying to prove the worth of his discovery, is now ready to cash in — by selling original prints of the photographs to museums and collectors.

“I have estimated that his $45 investment easily could be worth up to $200 million,” Streets said.

Written by Peter C in: Arts,History,Photography | Tags: , ,
Jul
27
2010
0
Jul
27
2010
0

Downtown by Mrs. Miller

Thanks Ray C.

Written by Peter C in: Entertainment,Humor,Music,Video | Tags: ,
Jul
27
2010
0

Poupées gonflées! (NSFW)


Link
to article in French. Thanks Christo

Originally posted 2007-05-30 20:20:34.

Written by Peter C in: Asia,Humor,NSFW,Sex | Tags: ,
Jul
26
2010
0
Jul
22
2010
0
Jul
22
2010
0
Jul
22
2010
0
Jul
21
2010
0

MIT software program decodes “lost” languages…

From Nat Geo:

A new computer program has quickly deciphered a written language last used in Biblical times—possibly opening the door to “resurrecting” ancient texts that are no longer understood, scientists announced last week.

Created by a team at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the program automatically translates written Ugaritic, which consists of dots and wedge-shaped stylus marks on clay tablets. The script was last used around 1200 B.C. in western Syria.

Written examples of this “lost language” were discovered by archaeologists excavating the port city of Ugarit in the late 1920s. It took until 1932 for language specialists to decode the writing. Since then, the script has helped shed light on ancient Israelite culture and Biblical texts.

Using no more computing power than that of a high-end laptop, the new program compared symbol and word frequencies and patterns in Ugaritic with those of a known language, in this case, the closely related Hebrew.

Through repeated analysis, the program linked letters and words to map nearly all Ugaritic symbols to their Hebrew equivalents in a matter of hours.

The program also correctly identified Ugaritic and Hebrew words with shared roots 60 percent of the time. Shared roots are when words in different languages spring from the same source, such as the French homme and Spanish hombre, which share the Latin root for “man.”

Led by computer science professor Regina Barzilay, the team may be the first to show that a computer approach to dead scripts can be effective, despite claims that machines lack the necessary intuition.

(Related: “Video Games Help U.S. Soldiers Learn Arab Language, Culture.”)

“Traditionally, decipherment has been viewed as a sort of scholarly detective game, and computers weren’t thought to be of much use,” Barzilay said.

“Our aim is to bring to bear the full power of modern machine learning and statistics to this problem.”

Not Always a “Rosetta Stone”

The next step should be to see whether the program can help crack the handful of ancient scripts that remain largely incomprehensible.

Etruscan, for example, is a script that was used in northern and central Italy around 700 B.C. but was displaced by Latin by about A.D. 100. Few written examples of Etruscan survive, and the language has no known relations, so it continues to baffle archaeologists.

(Related: “Languages Racing to Extinction in Five Global ‘Hotspots.’”)

“In the case [of Ugaritic], you’re dealing with a small and simple writing system, and there are closely related languages,” noted Richard Sproat, an Oregon Health and Science University computational linguist who was not involved in the new work.

“It’s not always going to be the case that there are closely related languages that one can use” for Rosetta Stone-like comparisons.

But study leader Barzilay thinks the decoding program can overcome this hurdle by scanning multiple languages at once and taking contextual information into account—improvements that could uncover unexpected similarities or links to known languages.

Written by Peter C in: History,Hmmn. Interesting.,Tech | Tags:
Jul
20
2010
0

TypAchive — Wonderful image library primarily focused on hand painted signage

TypArchive is an image library primarily focused on hand painted signage.
The objective is to amass a comprehensive global collection of a high-quality images and produce hard-copy volumes.

Amidst a landscape of vapid strip malls and sterile signage, hand-painted lettering retains a soulful aesthetic to be treasured. Like other crafts dissolving in the digital age, sign painting is a fading occupation. Today it’s easy for any layman with minimal computer knowledge to produce a sign within minutes, but the skill acquired to artfully produce hand lettering took years of apprenticeships, dedication and true talent. – RD Granados

Previously related:

Written by Peter C in: Arts,History,Hmmn. Interesting. | Tags: , ,
Jul
19
2010
2
Jul
19
2010
0

Taiwanese TV Animation explains Antennagate

While I don’t understand Mandarin, this all makes perfect sense to me.

Written by Peter C in: Asia,Events,Humor,Tech,Video | Tags: , ,
Jul
19
2010
1

Found collection — Vintage bottle caps

bottlecaps1bottlecaps2bottlecaps3bottlecaps41bottlecaps5bottlecaps6bottlecaps7

Originally posted 2009-06-08 09:20:52.

Written by Peter C in: Advertising,Arts,Design,Vintage | Tags: , ,
Jul
15
2010
0
Jul
15
2010
0

YouTube response to Old Spice guy… (Dove viral?)

Related Posts with Thumbnails
Written by Peter C in: Advertising,Humor,Video | Tags: , ,

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